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'The Music of Hoagy Carmichael and Phil Moore' to discuss race, experiences



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“The Music of Hoagy Carmichael and Phil Moore” will discuss the parallels in the music and lives of Carmichael, a white man from Bloomington, and Phil Moore, a black orphan from Portland, Oregon, in the Hoagy Carmichael Room.  IDS file photo Buy Photos

An IU librarian and an archivist will hold a listening session and discussion to compare the music of pianists Hoagy Carmichael and Phil Moore at noon Feb. 27 at the Archives of Traditional Music. 

The event, titled “The Music of Hoagy Carmichael and Phil Moore,” will feature Archives of Traditional Music librarian Allison McClanahan and Black Film Center/Archive archivist Ronda Sewald will lead the discussion in the Hoagy Carmichael Room. The event's topic is the parallels in the music and lives of Carmichael, a white man from Bloomington, and Moore, a black orphan from Portland, Oregon.

Much of both Carmichael and Moore’s music has recently been digitized, and these songs will played during the event’s listening session.

After the session, there will be a question and answer portion for the audience. The Black History Month event is sponsored by the Archives of Traditional Music and Black Film Center/Archive.

Carmichael was an award-winning, massively popular jazz singer, songwriter and pianist in the 1930s and 1940s. He is known for hit songs “Stardust,” “Georgia On My Mind” and “In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening” and his later career as a television and film actor. 

Moore was a jazz pianist, arranger and band leader that worked around Carmichael’s time in the 1940s. He is known for arranging jazz songs for Paramount and MGM and his work with Frank Sinatra. He released nine albums as a band leader during his career.

The event is free and open to the public. 

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