opinion   |  column

COLUMN: Republican safe spaces



Two Republican lawmakers from Arizona are calling for a safe space from social justice ideals on university campuses and are so proving that even conservatives want to limit our free speech now.

It’s sickening.

State representatives Bob Thorpe and Mark Finchem recently proposed a bill that would essentially make it illegal for universities to sanction classes, student groups or events that single out a specific race.

This ridiculously broad law would make it impossible to have clubs like a Black Student Alliance or teach a class on race relations between whites and Mexicans in America.

Thorpe said he doesn’t want anyone to be blamed for the actions of their ancestors 200 years ago, so he doesn’t think it makes sense for to have groups that single out one race or ethnicity.

He’s afraid of students being vilified because they are white Americans.

I know some leftist extremists would probably try to make me feel guilty for my skin color, but those people are few and far between, not to mention the fact that no one even takes them seriously.

Thorpe and Finchem are trying to suppress the freedoms of countless people in a laughable attempt to stop a problem that hardly exists.

Freedom of speech is already dying on too many college campuses, but the calls to restrict what we can and cannot say generally come from the left.

Apparently republicans want their turn to whine.

We’re seeing two right-wing lawmakers attempt to create their own bastions of ignorance.

I understand it’s gratifying when people agree with us.

We’re humans — we want to feel validated and important — but if the only way that people like this can find validation is through silencing the 
opposition, you can count me out.

Thorpe and Finchem probably don’t even understand the hypocrisy they’re displaying.

If someone wanted universities to rid themselves of any pro-gun or pro-life groups, I’m sure they would take offense.

The marketplace of ideas is a sacred, integral part of American culture, and people who want it to end on our campuses make me feel physically ill.

Universities pride themselves on offering us an enriching, enlightening experience.

If we don’t combat ideas we hate with ones of our own, we don’t grow.

I urge IU and all other colleges across the country to fight back against this sort of tyranny and to allow students to speak their minds freely without concern of government or university retribution.

Student media, student advocacy, and student welfare all depend on our ability to speak freely about what we think.

Many conservatives laugh at the idea of a safe space, but I wonder how many would agree with Thorpe and Finchem’s plan to abolish student groups and course options based on race.

We need to come together as a nation and realize that freedoms of speech and expression trump anyone’s feelings.

If you need a safe space, go home and lock your door until you’ve cooled off.

Keep my university free.

Like what you're reading? Support independent, award-winning college journalism on this site. Donate here.

More in Column



Comments powered by Disqus