Indiana Daily Student

Nicole Krasean


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In the last year, 75 people have died from heroin overdoes at Indiana University Health Bloomington Hospital, more than double the number the year before. "The sad reality is someone could be using today, they could want to quit today, but they can't get into services today," Penny Caudill, Monroe County Health Administrator said. "There aren't enough resources for addictions in Monroe County, in the State of Indiana, probably across the country." On Monday, Dec. 7, Crafton and Price will appear in court in an effort to discontinue their treatment at the Lighthouse.

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Price stays at his home in Springville, IN during his weekend passes with his wife Ashley and his children Aiden, Logan and Kira. Price is very affectionate with his family and dotes upon Kira any chance he gets. Kira turned two over the Thanksgiving holiday, and Price was able to spend the day with her. Price said his parents enabled him in his drug use.

In the last year, 75 people have died from heroin overdoes at Indiana University Health Bloomington Hospital, more than double the number the year before. "The sad reality is someone could be using today, they could want to quit today, but they can't get into services today," Penny Caudill, Monroe County Health Administrator said. "There aren't enough resources for addictions in Monroe County, in the State of Indiana, probably across the country." On Monday, Dec. 7, Crafton and Price will appear in court in an effort to discontinue their treatment at the Lighthouse.

At the Lighthouse, Crafton finally has a bed to sleep in and a place to receive the treatment he sought out for months in jail. Price sleeps on the bunk below him and the few belongings the men have with them at the center either hang from their bed posts or are placed on and inside the drawers beside their bunks.

During his weekend passes, Crafton gets picked up from the Lighthouse by his brother Jared and stays with him and his family at his home in Bedford, IN. At Jared's home, he has saved letters Aaron wrote him during his time in jail, which Aaron reads over in Jared's living room. On Halloween, Crafton gave his brother and his wife a one-year anniversary card. The year before, on Jared's wedding day, Aaron overdosed on heroin and almost died.

Mary Goetze volunteers for New Leaf New Life, a nonprofit organization that offers services to inmates at the Monroe County Jail, and has served as a Court Appointed Special Advocate. Goetze was one of the women who drove Crafton from the jail to the Lighthouse. A former faculty member at IU's Jacobs School of Music, Goetze helped Crafton and other residents at the Lighthouse write and record songs about their recovery. She also recorded both Crafton and Price reading children's books that were later sent on CDs with a hard copy of the book to Crafton's nephew and Price's children.

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The Lighthouse is a religion-based recovery program that advertises itself as a "God ordained recovery center". The center has a prayer room overlooking the cornfields of Washington where residents write the names of people they want prayed for on a white board. When in the Monroe County Jail, Crafton and Price were visited by a pastor who prophesized that the two men would lead each other on a spiritual journey of recovery.

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Cody Price, left, arrived at the Lighthouse days before Crafton did at the end of the summer. Price and Crafton are inseparable friends who used intraveneous drugs together and also were locked up together in the Monroe County Jail before both being admitted to the Lighthouse. During their 24-hour and 48-hour passes from the Lighthouse, the two often spend some, if not most, of their time together and with each others' families.

The Lighthouse Recovery Center is located in Washington, IN, an hour and a half from Bloomington, IN, where Crafton grew up and began using. The Lighthouse offers a nine month to two year program for men and women in separate facilities. Crafton was unable to receive treatment closer to home due to the fact that Monroe County lacks a state-certified inpatient treatment program that lasts longer than 28 days.

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