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IU chemistry professors develop, license technology for genetic disease drug research

<p>The Chemistry Building is pictured in April 2018. Two IU chemistry professors have licensed their newly developed technology, a gene- and cell-based therapy, to the Waters Corporation.</p>

The Chemistry Building is pictured in April 2018. Two IU chemistry professors have licensed their newly developed technology, a gene- and cell-based therapy, to the Waters Corporation.

Two IU chemistry professors have licensed their newly developed technology, which can help advance gene- and cell-based therapy, to the Waters Corporation, a lab instrument and software company. 

The new technology, called charge detection mass spectronomy or CDMS, helps scientists to accurately measure certain genes or cells so that drug manufacturers can make stronger treatments for diseases. 

Licensing the CDMS technology to the Waters Corporation will allow it to be used in research for genetic diseases, according to a News at IU article.

Professors Martin Jarrold and David Clemmer founded their startup company, Megadalton Solutions, to aid in creating gene- and cell-based therapies, according to the article. 

The advantage of CDMS technology is that it allows molecules to be analyzed more quickly and accurately than existing technologies can, Jarrold said in the article. 

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Mass spectronomy technology is also part of the development of vaccines such as the ones used to fight COVID-19. 

The electronic instrument services group and mechanical instrument services group at the IU Department of Chemistry also assisted in creating the experimental equipment needed for developing the CDMS technology, according to the article.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this article misstated what product was licensed to the Waters Corporation.

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