We've redesigned our website, please let us know what you think.
Indiana Daily Student

U.S. House introduces bill to support student-athletes’ name, image, likeness rights

<p>Then-freshman Mackenzie Holmes shouts after drawing a foul and scoring a basket Dec. 11, 2019, at Hinkle Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. A bipartisan bill introduced to the House of Representatives Thursday aims to federally permit college athletes from profiting off of their name and likeness.</p>

Then-freshman Mackenzie Holmes shouts after drawing a foul and scoring a basket Dec. 11, 2019, at Hinkle Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. A bipartisan bill introduced to the House of Representatives Thursday aims to federally permit college athletes from profiting off of their name and likeness.

Bipartisan legislation was introduced in the United States House of Representatives called the a Student Athlete Level Playing Field Act, which would allow collegiate athletes to pursue deals involving their name, image and likeness without their universities or the NCAA prohibiting them, on Thursday morning,. The bill proposes congressional oversight to the process. 

The bill's include co-sponsors Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II of Missouri, a wide receiver at Murray State University in the 1960s, Rep. Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio, an All-Big Ten wide receiver at Ohio State and 2007 first round draft pick of the Indianapolis Colts and Rep. Colin Allred of Texas, a linebacker at Baylor University and for the Tennessee Titans.

If passed, the bill would allow NCAA athletes to sign paid endorsement deals with any company, except for those involving alcohol, tobacco, controlled substances, adult entertainment or gambling. The student-athlete would also be allowed to sign with an agent if their school is notified.

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J. and Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn. proposed a "College Athlete Bill of Rights" Aug. 13 that more broadly addressed some of the practices in college sports they say are unfair to athletes.

In October 2019, the NCAA Board of Governors voted unanimously to allow student-athletes to profit from their name, image and likeness by January 2021, once its three committees decide upon rules.

In August, IU announced a deal with Opendorse Ready, which that aims to help IU athletes effectively explore how to capitalize on their name, image and likeness rights.

Like what you're reading?

Get more award-winning content delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for our Weekly Recap.

Like what you're reading? Support independent, award-winning college journalism on this site. Donate here.

Comments


Powered by Solutions by The State News
All Content © 2020 Indiana Daily Student