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Professors required to report students who attend Zoom calls naked



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A computer displaying Zoom sits on a table. IU instructors were warned that students may be dropping into Zoom calls to participate in online class completely naked. Izzy Myszak

Some IU instructors were warned in an email last week that students may be dropping into Zoom calls to participate in online class completely naked, IU spokesperson Chuck Carney said.

Carney said instructors have been informed that they are required to report any instances of nudity because it violates the Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and Conduct, and because the incident could be a sign of psychological distress. 

The email was sent to instructors in the Media School with guidance from the Division of Student Affairs on how to handle the incidents, Carney said. He said he wasn't sure if other schools in the university have sent similar emails, but the guidance applies to all IU instructors.

“It’s considered sexual harassment,” Carney said.

Students who choose to expose themselves in this way risk suspensions or expulsions.

Depending on the circumstances, Carney said, the incidents may be charged under personal misconduct, sexual misconduct or academic misconduct.

These students will also be psychologically evaluated on a case-by-case basis. If it is determined that the student is struggling to cope, the university will try to get them the help they need, Carney said.

Carney said Zoom calls are still considered university property during class, so IU can treat these instances as if they were happening on the university’s physical campus. 

If a student notices any nudity while on a Zoom call, they should alert the professor, who will report the instance to the Office of Student Conduct. Students are also encouraged to report instances to the office.

Correction: A previous version of this story didn’t specify which instructors received an email regarding Zoom calls or where the email came from. The IDS regrets this error.

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