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IU chapter of Kappa Sigma suspended by national headquarters



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A flag stating, "Olympus has fallen," hangs in the windows of the IU chapter of Kappa Sigma on Dec. 4. The chapter was withdrawn Dec. 3 due to hazing and alcohol violations. The chapter is to suspend all activities and turn over the property and charter immediately. Ty Vinson Buy Photos

The IU chapter of Kappa Sigma has been suspended by its national headquarters, according to a letter from the fraternity’s executive director.

The Beta-Theta chapter was withdrawn Dec. 3 due to hazing and alcohol violations, according to the letter. The chapter is to suspend all activities and turn over the property and charter immediately.

“We are informing the University and the campus community that the Kappa Sigma Chapter is no longer in operation in any form or fashion,” Mitchell Wilson, the Kappa Sigma executive director, said in the letter. 

Taps was blaring from inside the Kappa Sigma house Tuesday afternoon. A blue banner flapped in the wind.

“Olympus has fallen,” it said. 

Any attempt to continue operating the chapter underground is grounds for suspension or expulsion, Wilson said in the letter. The fraternity may also pursue legal action against members of the former chapter.

Eli Friedlander, president of Kappa Sigma, was walking around in front of the chapter house with a hammer in his hand, used by others to remove the letters from the house, around 4:15 p.m. 

“I have absolutely no comment on this matter,” Friedlander said. 

The chapter has 30 days to appeal the decision from its national headquarters, according to the letter.

The chapter can continue to live in its house for the rest of the semester, but afterward must vacate the premises, said IU spokesman Chuck Carney. 

The University supports the national organization's decision, Carney said.

The Interfraternity Council could not immediately be reached for comment and the Beta-Theta chapter declined to comment.

Lexi Haskell contributed reporting to this story.

This story has been updated to clarify the context in which a subject was using a hammer.

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