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Indiana Daily Student

Clinton, Kaine head to Philadelphia to begin DNC

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Douglass Park Gymnasium in Indianapolis on Sunday ahead of the May 3 Primary Elections in Indiana. Clinton spoke about a slew of topics including healthcare, foreign policy and drug addiction.
Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Douglass Park Gymnasium in Indianapolis on Sunday ahead of the May 3 Primary Elections in Indiana. Clinton spoke about a slew of topics including healthcare, foreign policy and drug addiction.

The stickers, the posters and the signs have been printed — the Clinton-Kaine ticket is official.

Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton spoke with her newly announced vice president nominee Tim Kaine in Miami on July 22. The two are preparing to accept the democratic nominee at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia beginning Monday.

The DNC speaker schedule listed keynote speakers including both the first lady and the president, Vice President Joe Biden; Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-Vt.; and Bill and Chelsea Clinton. Additionally speakers were added Thursday, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

With a running theme of “Stronger Together,” the four-day convention features events such as Women’s Caucus, LGBT Caucus and a Jewish Roundtable.

Roll call for delegates to formally select a nominee is set for Monday. Indiana will be represented by a total of 83 delegates. After his win in the primary, Sanders has 44 pledged delegates to Clinton’s 39.

Sanders’ supporters were upset when Wikileaks released nearly 20,000 emails to and from DNC staffers that call the presidential candidate a “damn liar” among other hostilities. DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz announced she will be stepping down following the convention.

After Sanders’ endorsement for Clinton’s campaign, Clinton’s delegates are hoping they can change the opinions of those pledged to Sanders, District 4 Clinton delegate Charlotte Martin said.

“That is their right to feel that way, but I think they should feel happy that Bernie did get some rules passed,” Martin said.

A longtime Clinton supporter, Martin spoke favorably of vice president nominee Kaine as well, noting that he is a well-respected Democrat.

After the vice presidential announcement the Virginia senator generated media buzz when he greeted the Miami crowd in Spanish Saturday afternoon.

It’s expected this was an effort to win over Hispanic voters, despite Clinton leading Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump 66 percent to 24 percent for Hispanic voters, according to Pew Research’s July 7 polling numbers.

Prior to winning his senate seat in 2012, Kaine’s political resume includes lieutenant governor of Virginia, governor of Virginia and chair of the Democratic National 
Committee.

An unwavering democrat, Kaine supports the Affordable Care Act but opposes the death penalty. He favors both comprehensive immigration reform and stronger gun control. During Kaine’s senate campaign the National Rifle Association gave him an “F” rating after endorsing his opponent Virginia Gov. George Allen instead.

Similar to Clinton, Kaine’s stance on social issues has progressed over the years. Deeply rooted in Catholicism, Kaine signed abortion-restricting laws during his time as governor and told “Meet the Press” host Chuck Todd “I don’t like it personally. I’m opposed to abortion.” He has since won praise from Planned Parenthood for his pro-choice votes.

Kaine’s support for the LGBT community has also evolved. Again, his religious background conflicted with the idea of same-sex marriage. However, while in the Senate, Kaine signed off on the brief to the Supreme Court deeming the Defense of Marriage Act, signed by former president Bill Clinton, unconstitutional.

District 5 delegate Annette Gross said LGBT acceptance takes time for some people. Gross, who describes herself as a proud mother of a gay son and an LGBT advocate, writes for the Huffington Post. She was the former president of PFLAG, formerly known as Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays.

“I think everyone is allowed that privilege or opportunity to change their mind,” she said. “We all evolve.”

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