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IU Soul Revue to open for Bootsy Collins at Cincinnati Music Festival



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Musician Bootsy Collins speaks about the beginning of his career in funk music, stating, "It was hard not to use the word funk, because our whole situation was funked up." Collins spoke with Dr. Scot Brown from UCLA Tuesday evening at IU Cinema during the event Funkology. Ty Vinson Buy Photos

On March 20, funk singer-songwriter Bootsy Collins performed with the IU Soul Revue, one of three ensembles in the African American Arts Institute.

He danced along to the group's renditions of songs he was originally part of, such as "Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine" and "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag."

"You're all just incredible, man," Collins said to the performers at the event in March. "I'm speechless."

Having been so impressed with the group, Collins invited the group to open for him July 28 at the Cincinnati Music Festival. The group will perform alongside artists including Jill Scott, Common and the Roots.

James Strong, director of the IU Soul Revue, took a few Soul Revue members to perform with Collins and his band in Los Angeles.

Collins' connection to campus through the Archives of African American Music and Culture, when they brought him for Funkology: A Conversation with Bootsy Collins and Dr. Scot Brown.

Along with music and performances, Collins talked about the history of funk, his influences and funk's revival through artists, such as Bruno Mars and Childish Gambino.

“I think it’s an opportunity for us all to embrace each other,” Collins said at the event. “The funk is the thing to bring everybody together.” 

Collins got his start with James Brown in the 1970s before becoming an established name in funk during his time in Parliament-Funkadelic.

Clark Gudas

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