Archie Miller hired as new IU basketball coach



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Dayton head coach Archie Miller reacts to a call in the first round of the NCAA Tournament on March 17 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. Miller has just been selected as IU men's basketball head coach.  Tribune News Service / Tribune News Service Buy Photos

After a nine-day search, IU Athletics Director Fred Glass hired former Dayton head coach Archie Miller on Saturday. Miller will be introduced as the 29th head coach in IU men's basketball history at a press conference at 3 p.m. Monday at Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall.

Miller will sign a seven-year contract in the range of $4 million per year, according to Yahoo's Adrian Wojnarowski.

Glass said in an IU Athletics press release that Miller was on his short list from the beginning of the search.

 “The more I learned about him, the more convinced I became that he is the coach we need to meet our high expectations for many years to come," Glass said. "First, he has the commitments to compliance, wellness, and academics that we require at Indiana."

Miller, 38, has done plenty of winning in his first job as head coach at Dayton in the Atlantic-10 conference. In six years under Miller, the Flyers missed out on the NCAA Tournament the first two seasons but made four straight in his final four years including a trip to the Elite Eight in 2014.

2017 was Miller’s best year at Dayton, as he went 24-8 overall and 15-3 in conference play while the Flyers won back-to-back Atlantic-10 regular season titles. Dayton earned a No. 7 seed in this year's NCAA Tournament but lost in the first round to No. 10 Wichita State.

Noting IU's prestige for basketball and academics, Miller said in the release he's honored to have the position and can't wait to get started.

"With peerless fan support, outstanding facilities and tradition, a beautiful campus, and located in one of the most fertile recruiting areas in the country, IU is a dream destination for me and my family," Miller said. "I cannot wait to connect with former players, current players, and future players and all of Hoosier Nation."

Miller played four years at North Carolina State as point guard and helped the Wolfpack get back to the NCAA tournament in 2002 for the first time in 11 years. 

Glass said he wanted a proven winner, recruiter and player developer during his press conference March 16. According to the release he believes Miller fits all three of those aspects while coaching with a defense-first mentality that will help IU win championships in the future.

"Perhaps most importantly, he understands and embraces the special stature of Indiana University basketball and the critical relationship it must have with its former players, Indiana high school players and programs, and the entire State of Indiana,” Glass said.

Dayton was ranked 41st in the nation for adjusted defensive efficiency this past season allowing 0.96 points per possession. IU was ranked 105th and allowed nearly 1.2 points per possession. The Flyers also only turned the ball over 11.8 times per game this past season, good enough for 61st in the nation, while the Hoosiers finished 333rd in that category with 15.2 turnovers per game.

Miller comes from a basketball coaching family. His father, John, coached high school basketball, and his older brother, Sean, is the Arizona head coach. Miller served as an assistant at Arizona before becoming the Dayton head coach.

He’s also been an assistant at Western Kentucky, North Carolina State, Arizona State and Ohio State throughout his career. In addition, Miller worked on the staff with the USA under-19 team, which won the FIBA world championship medal in 2015.

"I want to thank all of the great people and players at the University of Dayton who have supported me along the way," Miller said. "I look forward to outlining my vision for IU basketball and offering my sincerest appreciation for the great people at Dayton on Monday.”

His overall record as head coach at Dayton was 139-63, whereas Crean's Marquette record was 190-96 when he was hired at IU.  

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