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Monday, June 17
The Indiana Daily Student

arts music review

COLUMN: ‘Call Me If You Get Lost: The Estate Sale’ proves Tyler, the Creator can’t make bad music

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I didn’t think that “Call Me If You Get Lost” could get better. It’s the perfect album: Tyler, the Creator’s natural cadence paired with DJ Drama’s hype man role feels harmonic. I wouldn’t change a thing.  

Then “The Estate Sale” was released. 

Comprised of eight new tunes — the first acting as a fan thank you and introduction — “Call Me If You Get Lost: The Estate Sale” builds off the style and fanfare of the original album, whilst adding new signatures of its own. 

The first true track “STUNTMAN” featuring Vince Staples is easy to follow. It’s a carefully crafted pop track that is sure to hit the charts soon. Staples compliments Tyler’s chaotic nature by creating a conversational feel to the verses. They’re stunting on their fans by showcasing their effortless talent. 

“WHAT A DAY” evokes a calmer atmosphere with its sampled chorus. I originally thought the sample said, “What a day to get lost,” an almost perfect alignment to the theme of the album. Instead, the singer says, “What a day at the park,” which is fine, but not what I wanted personally. Either way, the song subtly flexes Tyler’s wealth, adding homages to various high-end LA suburbs. 

Related: [COLUMN: How upcycling helped fix my body dysmorphia]

On the morning of its release, Tyler tweeted how “WHARF TALK” was his favorite of these releases. I have to agree. Focusing on Tyler’s singing and giving a cameo to none other than A$AP Rocky, it feels like a night out on the water with friends. If the one takeaway from this review is to listen to “WHARF TALK,” I’ve done my job right. 

“DOGTOOTH” has my favorite chorus on “The Estate Sale” and one of my favorite lyrical cadences I’ve heard in music. “She can ride my face, I don’t want nothin’ in return” is such a good line. I have no bad words to say. 

Tyler fantasizes about the future in “HEAVEN TO ME.” It’s cute and sweet, but not as sweet as “BOYFRIEND, GIRLFRIEND.” This is the “SWEET/I THOUGHT YOU WANTED TO DANCE” of the Estate Sale. It’s more of a horny song than “SWEET” but it holds the same romantic sentiment. With phrases like “wishing on a star,” it’s purely adorable. 

The album closes with “SORRY NOT SORRY.” As a person who compulsively says sorry, I adore this song. Tyler apologizes for everything that’s wrong with him while realizing that everyone is just like him. The general apologies make it relatable to everyone. The song ends how the original cut of the album ends, bringing the whole thing full circle. 

If you’re a Tyler, the Creator fan, you’ll love delving into these B-sides. If you’ve never listened to Tyler, the Creator before, this new release is an amazing place to start.

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