Indiana Daily Student

Pictura Gallery to present Gallery Walk reception and artist talk for new project

<p>Shrum Mound, a Native American burial ground in Columbus, Ohio, is pictured. Sherwin&#x27;s exhibit aims to explore sites of Indigenous American presence as sites where cultures converge, according to the press release from Pictura Gallery.</p>

Shrum Mound, a Native American burial ground in Columbus, Ohio, is pictured. Sherwin's exhibit aims to explore sites of Indigenous American presence as sites where cultures converge, according to the press release from Pictura Gallery.

Pictura Gallery will present a Gallery Walk Opening Reception and Artist Talk for artist Michael Sherwin on April 1. The gallery walk portion will occur from 5-8 p.m. and the artist talk portion will take place at 7:15 p.m at Pictura Gallery on South Rogers Street. 

The event is free and open to the public. Masks are encouraged. 

In the past, Sherwin’s work has been featured in publications such as The Washington Post, Buzzfeed News and Art Papers magazine, among others, and has been shown in galleries across the country. He is currently an associate professor of art in the School of Art and Design at West Virginia University.

For Pictura Gallery, Sherwin will present “Vanishing Points.” According to a press release for “Vanishing Points,” the artist photographed significant sites of Indigenous American presence, including sacred landforms, archeological sites and battlegrounds, in an attempt to show the convergence of two cultures.

Related: [COLUMN: 4 female-authored books to read during Women’s History Month]

Sherwin said the idea for the project came from his own past and personal experiences. As both a white, non-native U.S. citizen and someone whose spiritual beliefs mirror Indigenous beliefs, he said he felt particularly affected by this cultural dichotomy.

The project began in Morgantown, West Virginia, where Sherwin took a photo of a shopping center built on a Monongahelan village and burial site. He said the photograph was both rooted in the present moment and connected to ancient history.

Like what you're reading?

Get more award-winning content delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for our Daily Rundown.

Signup today!
Like what you're reading? Support independent, award-winning college journalism on this site. Donate here.

Powered by Solutions by The State News
All Content © 2022 Indiana Daily Student