Indiana Daily Student

Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance features ‘Macbeth’

<p>Second year MFA acting student Christopher Centinaro is seen during one of his monologues as Macbeth on Wednesday in Maxwell Hall. Macbeth will be showing Thursday through Saturday at Gayle Karch Cook Center for Public Arts &amp; Humanities in Maxwell Hall. </p>

Second year MFA acting student Christopher Centinaro is seen during one of his monologues as Macbeth on Wednesday in Maxwell Hall. Macbeth will be showing Thursday through Saturday at Gayle Karch Cook Center for Public Arts & Humanities in Maxwell Hall.

The IU Department of Theatre, Drama, and Contemporary Dance is putting on a production of “Macbeth” in the Gayle Karch Cook Center for Public Arts and Humanities in Maxwell Hall. The performance will be at 7:30 p.m.Thursday through Saturday, with a matinee at 2:00 p.m. Saturday. This production has a runtime of about 90 minutes.

Tickets do not need to be purchased, as limited seating will be available for free on a first-come, first-serve basis.

The event posting calls the adaptation fast-paced and actor-driven.

“This show was very fast-paced because we only had eight rehearsals to put a whole Shakespeare play together,” Eboni Edwards, who plays Lady Macbeth, said. “The prep work that I did over the winter break let me be free in the rehearsal room.” 

This production, which is directed by Grant Goodman, features eight actors playing 35 roles. Edwards said having Goodman as a director was a collaborative process, which allowed her and her fellow actors to explore other creative sides of themselves. 

Edwards also said the stage manager of this production, Onyea Cummings, emphasizes checking in on the actors by making sure they check in with one another. Cummings said (she) wants to have actors tap in and tap out of character, due to the number of fight scenes and intimate moments featured in this production. She said this allows the actors to set their own boundaries with each other.

“Theatre is so spiritual and such a community,” Edwards said, “Shakespeare’s text is so perfect because the plays are for the audience.”

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story misspelled Eboni Edwards.

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