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Indiana Daily Student

What to know about IU fall and winter special session courses

<p>The sun sets Oct. 10 behind the leaves of a tree on Seventh Street.</p>

The sun sets Oct. 10 behind the leaves of a tree on Seventh Street.

Fall intensive courses and winter intersession courses are a good opportunity for students to take classes that interest them but might not fulfill major requirements, Mark Hurley, director of advising for the College of Arts and Sciences, said.

Some fall intensive courses cover current events and hot topics, such as “Policing Black Men” and “Boycotts: Bloomington & Beyond.” The courses are almost all one to two credit hours and will take place from Nov. 30 to Dec. 20. The last day to sign up for the classes is Nov. 30, after which students will have to get permission from the instructor to join.

The winter intersession courses, offered from Dec. 21 to Feb. 7, offer more courses that fulfill degree or general education requirements, including Public Oral Communication and a critical approaches course, Hurley said. These courses can be enrolled in like any other spring term course.

“Really, they’re an opportunity for instructors and students to explore some topics they might not otherwise get to explore,” Hurley said.

Special session classes can be added using the eDrop and eAdd features on One.IU. Hurley said students should keep in mind that the classes happen in a very compressed time and, as such, might have a greater workload than a traditional class.

Fall intensive courses are duing finals week, which means if students have a lot of difficult finals, they should think carefully about taking any fall intensive classes, Hurley said.

Students should read the course descriptions before taking a class, Hurley said. The list of classes that can be found on the College’s website . Hurley said he encourages students to meet with their advisors before making a decision.

All of the courses will be held over Zoom, said Rick Van Kooten, executive dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Courses are listed as synchronous, asynchronous or hybrid on the College’s website.

Van Kooten said the special session courses are offered so there isn’t a large block of time between Thanksgiving and February where students are doing nothing. The courses offer interesting educational opportunities, thematic courses or address current events, Van Kooten said. Interested students just need to sign up before the start of the class. 

Classes range in topics from serious issues, such as “Reforming Criminal Justice,” to lighter topics, like “Theme Park Design Psychology” or “Christmas in America.”

“The main thing people want to think about is, you know, do they have the energy or do they need a break between semesters?” Hurley said.

Students should find the balance between getting ahead academically and taking care of themselves during breaks, Hurley said.

There is no additional cost, as long as students stay under the 40 credit hour limit across fall and spring semesters under IU’s flat tuition rate, according to the College’s website. Students should see these special course sessions as an opportunity, Van Kooten said.

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