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Award-winning Israeli filmmaker Avi Nesher to visit IU Cinema next week



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The film “Rage and Glory,” is scheduled to screen at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 in the IU Cinema. The screening is also in honor of the film’s 35th anniversary.  Courtesy Photo Buy Photos

Director Avi Nesher, considered by some critics to be one of Israel’s greatest filmmakers of all time, will be visiting IU Cinema for a series of screenings of his work. 

Nesher, 65, has directed 20 feature films, with many of them winning prestigious Israeli filmmaking awards. Before becoming a filmmaker, he studied international relations at Columbia University. Later, Nesher returned to Israel to serve in the Army Special Forces before transitioning to filmmaking permanently. 

The screenings of Nesher’s work are part of IU Cinema’s Jorgensen Guest Filmmaker Program, a recurring series where screenings are accompanied by talks with the filmmakers. Previous visiting filmmakers this year include Nia DaCosta and Boots Riley.

Four of Nesher’s films will be screened at IU Cinema. 

“The Wonders” is a 2013 comedic tribute to film noir and other genres that follows a Jerusalem street artist named Arnav. It will be shown at 7 p.m. Feb. 18. 

The 1984 drama “Rage and Glory” will be honored at a 35th anniversary screening 7 p.m. Feb. 21. The film tells the story of an anarchist hitman sent to assassinate a British officer.

“The Other Story,” a 2018 drama about a man returning to Israel from the United States at his father’s request, will be shown at 7 p.m. Feb. 22. 

“SHE” is Nesher's 1984 post-apocalyptic action movie following a woman who leads a rogue nation where men are second-class citizens. It will be screened at 10 p.m. Feb. 22.  

All screenings in the series are free, but ticketed. Tickets can be reserved online or in-person at the IU Cinema box office before a screening.

In addition to the screenings, Nesher will also give a lecture at 7 p.m. Feb. 20 in the auditorium of the Global and International Studies Building. The lecture is free, and no ticket is required.

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