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Bicentennial Arts Contest deadline extended to July 13



Young people in the Bloomington area are invited to submit artwork for the Bicentennial Arts Contest, which showcases a minority or underrepresented person or organization from the community’s history, as part of the City of Bloomington and Monroe County Bicentennial Celebration.

The contest was created by a group representing the Bloomington Commission on the Status of Children and Youth, the Commission on the Status of Black Males, the Commission on the Status of Women, the Human Rights Commission, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration Commission and the Bloomington Arts Commission. 

Representatives of the Monroe County Bicentennial Planning Committee also joined the group.

“This is a diverse community with a proud history of inclusion, so we wanted to create a contest that highlighted that inclusiveness and allowed youth in the area to explore it using their creative talents,” Julie Warren, with the Commission on the Status of Children and Youth, said in a press release from the Office of the Mayor.

Art subjects should be people from underrepresented populations — such as racial, religious or ethnic minorities, people from the LGBT community, people with disabilities, those who are economically disadvantaged and anyone who has been overlooked. 

Participants should research the person or organization by using local resources such as the Monroe County Public Library and the Monroe County History Center.

The contest deadline has been extended to 5 p.m. July 13, and is open to any school-aged person who lives in Monroe County. There will be winners chosen from grades K to 2, 3 to 6, 7 to 8 and 9 to 12. 

A large range of arts — drawings, sculptures, songs, plays, videos and more — will be accepted. 

Participants can submit entries in person to the Community and Family Resources Department at City Hall, or by email to b-artscontest@bloomington.in.gov

Official guidelines and research resources are available on the Bloomington website.

Hannah Reed

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