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Indiana Daily Student

The final debate fact checked

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton participate in the third and final presidential debate at the University of Nevada Las Vegas on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (Yin Bogu/Xinhua/Sipa USA/TNS)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton participate in the third and final presidential debate at the University of Nevada Las Vegas on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, in Las Vegas. (Yin Bogu/Xinhua/Sipa USA/TNS)

For the final presidential debate, the Republican and Democratic nominees discussed a series of topics all related to the future presidency. The IDS fact-checked the candidates’ responses to these topics on a rating scale of true, mostly true, mostly false and false based on research of the facts behind the statements.

Supreme Court

Clinton: “Because I support the second amendment doesn’t mean that I want people who shouldn’t have guns to be able to threaten you, kill you or members of your family. And so when I think about what we need to do, we have 33,000 people a year who die from guns. I think we need comprehensive background checks. We need to close the online loophole, close the gun show loophole.” RATING: TRUE.

Ninety-one people per day are killed with guns, according to Everytown research. Therefore an average of 33,215 lives are lost due to gun violence every year.

Trump: “I’m very proud to have the endorsement of the NRA. It’s the earliest endorsement they’ve ever given to anybody who ran for president. I’m very honored by all of that.” RATING: MOSTLY TRUE

The NRA endorsed Trump in May 2016. This is earlier than the two previous Republican nominees, John McCain and Mitt Romney, who both received their endorsements in October, a month before the general election.

Immigration

Clinton: “I have been for border security for years, and in the Senate, I voted for it.” RATING: TRUE

Hillary voted for the Secure Fence Act of 2006, which authorized about 700 miles of fencing to be installed along the country’s southern border, along with other security measures. It was the beginning of an attempt to pass comprehensive immigration reform.

Trump: “Drugs are pouring in through the border.” RATING: MOSTLY TRUE.

Many drugs come from Mexico, but a large amount also come from Afghanistan and other countries.

Economy

Clinton: “Donald’s plan has been analyzed to conclude it might lose jobs. Why? Because his whole plan is to give the biggest tax breaks ever to the wealthy...” RATING: TRUE.

Trump’s proposal would deliver massive tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans and a relatively small amount to the poorest demographic, according to the advocacy group Citizens for Tax Justice.

Trump: “Through my program, I will create 25 million jobs, a 4 percent growth.” RATING: FALSE.

The Congressional Budget Office forecasts a rise of only 7 million in employment by 2026, according to the New York Times.

[Kelley students unswayed by Trump's financial plan | IDS]

Fitness to be president

Clinton: “The Clinton Foundation uses 90 percent of our profits to help others.” RATING: MOSTLY TRUE.

About 89 percent of the Clinton Foundation funding goes to charity. Nevertheless, about 6 percent of the tax charity money goes towards charity. This is the difference between a nonprofit organization and foundation.

Trump: “He went after a disabled reporter,” Clinton said. “Wrong,” Trump said. RATING: FALSE.

Trump did make fun of disabled reporter Serge Kovaleski in November 2015. There are multiple news outlets that produced the footage from the press conference.

Foreign hot spots

Clinton: “Donald is implying that he did not support the invasion of Iraq. But he was.” RATING: MOSTLY FALSE

There is no evidence Trump expressed public opposition to the war before the U.S. invaded. Rather, he offered lukewarm support. The Republican nominee only began to voice doubts about the conflict well after it began in March 2003.

Trump: “She gave us ISIS because her and Obama made this small vacuum,” Trump said. RATING: MOSTLY FALSE.

The rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria happened before Obama's presidency and Clinton's position as Secretary of State. Experts say people can blame both Bush and Obama for creating a vacuum in the region allowing the group to form. 

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