arts

Simplifying French cake



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This French cake recipe involves a batter that is made entirely in a jar. Audrey Perkins and Audrey Perkins Buy Photos

This week’s recipe is another dessert that looks more complicated to make than it is. Only this time, everything was simplified to make the process easy to clean up and easy to store in case you have extra batter.

Unlike most cakes where the batter is made in a large bowl and stirred or whipped until ready, this one is made entirely in a jar. Have limited kitchen equipment? This cake is for you. Find a leftover pasta sauce jar and shake up a five-minute cake batter with this recipe.

For those who have never tried a clafoutis before, it’s a traditional French cake that is similar to a baked custard. In terms of fillings, you can use any fruit you wish if you don’t have blackberries on hand. You can also use frozen fruit for a cheaper option.

  • 1 1/4 cup milk
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • pinch salt
  • 1 cup blackberries
  • butter to grease your pan

Equipment: strainer, optional

Step 1: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease your baking dish with a little butter. Pour the fruit into the dish in an even, spaced out layer.

Step 2: In a large jar, mix the eggs and flour together with a narrow spoon or fork until well combined. Add the honey, salt and vanilla. Once everything is well combined, add the milk last, stirring one last time. Close the jar with its lid.

Step 3: Shake for 3-5 minutes until everything is creamy and well blended. There should not be many lumps floating on top, however if there is, that is ok.

Step 4: While holding a strainer over your baking dish, pour the batter over the fruit. This step will catch any random lumps that remained. If you do not have a strainer, you can use a slotted cooking spoon instead or hold a fork to the edge of the jar as you pour.

Step 5: Bake for 45 minutes to an hour. The edges should be puffy and golden brown. The center will still have shine, but will not slosh around when the baking dish is jarred.

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