Indiana Daily Student

Hungarian commemoration exposes culture

Jessica Storey-Nagy (left in black), Hungarian Cultural Association President, together with the band consisting of Dr. Bence Ságvári, Isaac Bershady, Phil Hanley and Deb Shebish performing traditional Hungarian folk songs to the people present at the Commemoration of the 1848 Hungarian Revolution. The event was held on Tuesday at the University Club President's Room at the IMU.
Jessica Storey-Nagy (left in black), Hungarian Cultural Association President, together with the band consisting of Dr. Bence Ságvári, Isaac Bershady, Phil Hanley and Deb Shebish performing traditional Hungarian folk songs to the people present at the Commemoration of the 1848 Hungarian Revolution. The event was held on Tuesday at the University Club President's Room at the IMU.

IU Hungarian Cultural Association President Jessica Storey-Nagy instructed the attendees to rise for the evening’s introduction.

“We are now going to sing the Hungarian National Anthem,” she said.

Hungarian men, women and children stood and embraced the singing of their anthem. Smiles blossomed on their faces as the annual celebration of their country’s revolution was about to begin.

The commemoration of the 1848 Hungarian Revolution took place Tuesday in the Indiana Memorial Union University Club. Although the anniversary of the revolution is March 15, the ?commemoration was held earlier due to the upcoming break from classes.

The event was hosted by the IU HCA and was sponsored by the Central Eurasian and Uralic Studies Department, the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, the Russian and East European Institute and the IU Student Association.

“Celebrating the revolution is a way for us to connect the Hungarian community in Bloomington,” he said. “We try to bring people back to their roots.”

After the singing of the Hungarian National Anthem, the event continued with a commemorative speech, a musical performance, poetry readings and a final musical performance.

Torok said the HCA is always working to introduce people to their culture, as it isn’t the most popular club ?at IU.

“People coming today will learn about the cornerstones of Hungarian history,” he said. “They’ll get a feel for our culture and begin to understand what Hungary is all about.”

“Storey-Nagy said the majority of the attendees at the commemoration weren’t IU students, but members of the Bloomington Hungarian community.

“Many people are unaware of the small group of Hungarians living in Bloomington,” she said. “Having this commemoration brings everyone together.”

She also spoke of current issues going on in ?Hungary’s political world in relation to the importance of the ?commemoration.

“The way things are being carried out by the current Hungarian prime minister aren’t sticking to Hungary’s true values of a democratic nation,” she said. “Having this commemoration will only unite Hungarians more.”

During his speech, Fulbright Visiting Scholar Dr. Bence Sagvari spoke of the history of the Hungarian struggles and eventual revolution. He emphasized the importance of individuals cherishing their rights.

“Freedom, independence and democracy should not be taken for granted,” he said. “They should instead be taken advantage of each and ?every day.”

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