Monday rundown: IUMS loses National Championship game, college students face homelessness, 'Peter Pan' premieres Friday, EPA proposes shift in emissions regulations



morning rundown site

Editor's note: the IDS will not print during the semester break and will resume publication Jan. 5, 2018.

Men's soccer season ends in heartbreak in College Cup final

Junior midfielder Trevor Swartz reacts after IU lost 1-0 during overtime to Stanford at the NCAA Men's Soccer Tournament Championship game on Dec. 10 in Chester, Pennsylvania. Stanford scored a goal in the 103rd minute of the game. Noble Guyon Buy Photos

In a match of few chances, IU men’s soccer was defeated 1-0 by the Stanford Cardinal in Sunday’s NCAA Men’s Soccer Tournament National Championship game in Chester, Pennsylvania. Read more here.


Unrecognized

Nicole Allen recounts all the items she has packed away for her visit over Thanksgiving Break. She tried not to forget important things like books, movies and a homemade pumpkin pie that was given to her for her birthday.  These were all the items she needed to make herself feel at home in a house far away from home. Kayleigh Dance Buy Photos

Thousands of college students struggle to maintain the delicate balance between affording housing and education. But few people know it. Fourteen percent of community college students across the country are homeless, but it’s not just a community college problem. Read more here.


“Peter Pan” coming to Buskirk-Chumley Theater

Cardinal Stage Company will be performing "Peter Pan" Dec. 15 though Dec. 30. The musical adaptation of the story premiered first on Broadway in the 1950s. Movie Stills Database Buy Photos

The heartwarming classic “Peter Pan” is making its way to Bloomington for the holiday season. Cardinal Stage Company's production of the musical premieres Dec. 15 and runs through Dec. 30 at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. Read more here.


New trucks with old engines may be able to dodge emissions regulations

Glider kits, which put old engines in new trucks, are becoming at large with 10,000 vehicles currently on the road. New standards may be a possible solution in avoiding heavy emission regulations under the Environmental Protection Agency and even save money. Read more here.

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