Indiana Daily Student

Holcomb expresses support for school security, disapproval of gun regulations 

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb gives a speech Nov. 3, 2020, at the JW Marriott Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. Holcomb said May 25 that Indiana will continue supporting school security.
Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb gives a speech Nov. 3, 2020, at the JW Marriott Hotel in downtown Indianapolis. Holcomb said May 25 that Indiana will continue supporting school security.

Gov. Eric Holcomb said May 25 that Indiana will continue financially supporting school security. The statement was given at an announcement by Eli Lilly in response to a school shooting in Texas that left at least 21 dead. 

May 25 was the fourth anniversary of the shooting at Noblesville West Middle School, when a 13-year-old student shot and injured teacher Jason Seaman and student Ella Whistler. 

Holcomb said that Indiana needs to "do more of what we're doing," referring to investments made by the state in 2018. He said that, to date, Indiana has invested $110 million in school security. 

He opposed new gun regulations and supported a new law that eliminates the need for a permit to carry a handgun in public, which will take effect July 1.

While he said there is "room for discussion" in cases of people struggling with mental health issues, he doesn't think Indiana will take steps to restrict Hoosiers' ability to purchase weapons. 

“Folks who are struggling with violent mental health issues. Evil that lurks, whether it’s in a school or a playground, you name it,” Holcomb said. “This is the world we live in.”

Holcomb recently told the Los Angeles Times the solution was to focus on individual problems, and to continue providing grants to schools for security updates. 

Holcomb told 95.3 MNC that schools cannot let their guard down, and that Indiana legislature will not let them down when it comes to funding to help them do their jobs. He said schools must submit safety plans, and some are already doing so. 

“We have the means and we have the financial wherewithal to make sure that our schools maintain their integrity,” Holcomb said. “That means one port of entry. That’s why we make sure they have wands if needed.” 

Holcomb also added that there is room for talking within the legislature about strengthening red flag laws, which allow law enforcement to seize weapons from people they deem dangerous, regardless of if they’re committing a crime. 

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