Indiana Daily Student

Phi Kappa Psi fraternity removes member accused of sexual battery

<p>Phi Kappa Psi is located at 1200 N. Jordan Ave. The suspect of an alleged sexual battery is no longer a member of the fraternity, according to the chapter&#x27;s alumni adviser. </p>

Phi Kappa Psi is located at 1200 N. Jordan Ave. The suspect of an alleged sexual battery is no longer a member of the fraternity, according to the chapter's alumni adviser.

This story was updated with further comment from an IU spokesperson.

The Phi Kappa Psi fraternity removed a member accused of sexual battery, Ed Hawes, an alumni adviser to IU’s chapter, said in an email Wednesday morning. 

“The chapter took this matter very serious and determined the incident violates our zero tolerance policy regarding unacceptable behavior and immediately took action to remove him,” Hawes said.

[Related: UPDATE: IUPD investigating alleged sexual battery at Phi Kappa Psi fraternity]

Phi Kappa Psi’s national headquarters did not respond to requests for comment as of Wednesday afternoon. 

The Indiana University Police Department is investigating the incident, which allegedly occurred at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house Feb. 17. It was originally reported as a rape, but IUPD received new information categorizing it as a sexual battery, Deputy Chief Shannon Bunger said Tuesday afternoon. 

Sexual battery includes “forcible fondling” or inappropriate touching, but is not considered rape under the law, Bunger said. Under Indiana law, rape involves penetration while sexual battery is non-consensual sexual touching. Both are felonies.

No arrests have been made and police have yet to speak with the suspect, who was a member of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity at the time of the incident, Bunger said. 

IU spokesperson Chuck Carney said members of Phi Kappa Psi originally reported the incident to the Office of Student Conduct, who then notified IUPD. 

The woman wishes to remain anonymous and has not spoken with police as of Tuesday afternoon, Bunger said.

IU spokesperson Chuck Carney said members of Phi Kappa Psi originally reported the incident to the Office of Student Conduct, who then notified IUPD. He said IU did not issue a crime notice to students because of limited information about the alleged crime and the possibility that a notice could have impeded the ability of investigators to learn more about the case.

“The decision to not issue a crime notice was made because the information we received was more than a week after the incident, lacked sufficient details of what occurred, and, given that, did not appear to present a serious or continuing threat to the campus community,” Carney wrote in an email Wednesday evening. 

A list of resources is available here if you or someone you know has experienced sexual harassment or abuse.

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