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Quinceañera on Kirkwood: Celebrating 15 years of Fiesta de Otoño in Bloomington



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The quinceañera dress models circle around the runway Sept. 26 on Kirkwood Avenue. Several wear hoop skirts under their dresses to make the gowns puff out more. Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

Vanesa Quiroga strutted down Kirkwood Avenue in her purple quinceañera gown. It had been eight years since she wore the fluffy birthday dress for a crowd, which had been tucked away in the back of a closet. 

Quiroga, a 2020 IU graduate, and eight women modeled their quinceañera gowns around 12 p.m. Saturday for the Fiesta de Otoño, a community event organized annually for National Latinx Heritage Month by the City of Bloomington community and family resources department.

IU graduate Vanesa Quiroga dances to Latin music Sept. 26 on Kirkwood Avenue during the 15th annual Fiesta de Otoño . As the Fiesta de Otoño came to an end, attendees danced together in a circle. Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

 

IU senior Jocelyn Euceda worked with Josefa Luce, Latino programs coordinator at the City of Bloomington, to put together this event. Euceda said Fiesta de Otoño provides information about different Latinx organizations in Bloomington and Latinx culture to celebrate the community's presence in Bloomington.

“That’s just the first step, you know?” Euceda said in an interview. “Opening someone’s mind.”

Luce and the planning committee chose a quinceañera theme for this year’s Fiesta de Otoño, meaning fall festival in Spanish, to match the 15-year anniversary of the event. 

Dress models pose as family members and friends photograph them Sept. 26 on East Kirkwood Avenue. Quinceañera dresses cost between $300 and $900 at retailers such as Disney, according to the New York Times. Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

Quinceañeras are a birthday tradition and a rite of passage traditionally celebrated by Latin American and Latina girls for their 15th birthdays in the U.S. and Latin American countries. Contemporary quinceañeras involve DJs, event planners and makeup artists, according to the New York Times.

Backstage, Quiroga and the quinceañera models reminisced on their own 15th birthday celebrations. One girl wrapped her hair around a hot curling iron.

Quiroga said she couldn’t sleep before her quinceañera. It was a big deal.

Makeup brushes and eyeshadow palettes are strewn across tables Sept. 26 in the backstage of the15th annual Fiesta de Otoño . The models in the quinceañera fashion show help each other get ready before strutting down the runway on East Kirkwood Avenue. 15th annual Fiesta de Otoño Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

The Fiesta de Otoño took place on Kirkwood Avenue between Lincoln Street and Grant Street, a section set to stay closed for pedestrians through December to allow for socially distance seating during the coronavirus pandemic. Audience members had to RSVP to the Fiesta de Otoño to allow for proper social distancing, and were required to wear masks.

The festival started at 10 a.m. Pedestrians circled around the block to hear the Mariachi Perla del Medio Oeste perform around 11:30 a.m.

IU students Lalo Vera and Karen Rodriguez walk down the road Sept. 26 on Kirkwood Avenue. Rodriguez models her gown and tiara from her quinceañera. Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

Euceda, a social work major, said this is the second Fiesta de Otoño she has helped plan. She remembered her older sister’s quinceañera, for which they traveled to Puebla, Mexico, from Indianapolis to celebrate.

The event brought together Euceda’s family members from across the U.S. and Mexico. Similarly, the Fiesta de Otoño’s quinceañera brought together Latinx people in Bloomington.

“Just seeing everyone show out like that meant a lot,” Euceda said about her sister’s quinceañera. 

Before this event, Quiroga said she never thought she would wear her birthday gown again. It’s like a wedding dress, she said — a gown so special, it’s only worn once.

"You associate it to one memory and one memory only," Quiroga said about wedding and quinceañera dresses.

Quiroga remembered giving a speech in memory of her deceased grandma during a mass before her quinceañera’s reception, and burning her fingers while handmaking capias, or pin-ons, for the event with her mom. 

Quinceañeras are a meaningful event, where traditions are preserved and adapted to suit contemporary times.

A table of mementos from womens’ quinceañeras is on display at Kirkwood Avenue. Quinceañeras are a 15th birthday celebration and a rite of passage for Latin American and Latina teens celebrated in Latin American countries and the U.S.  Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

Quiroga said It’s important for people in Bloomington, a predominantly white town, to attend culturally diverse events such as these to understand people are empowered by their differences. 

“They’re not here to set us apart,” Quiroga said. “They’re here for us to learn from one another.”

Freshmen Maria Jaimes and Allejandra Spear pose for photos Sept. 26 on Kirkwood Avenue. Jaimes and Spear are best friends who both participated in the15th annual Fiesta de Otoño. Claudia Gonzalez-Diaz

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