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CUE presents Art of Resistance: Past and Present



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Freshman Elizabeth Algeri makes a craft Jan. 23 in the Willkie Auditorium. The Art of Resistance: Past and Present honored Martin Luther King Jr. and the history of black resistance. Izzy Myszak

The IU CommUnity Education Program, or CUE, organized the Art of Resistance: Past and Present event Thursday night to celebrate the history of black resistance and Martin Luther King Jr.

The event consisted of crafts and activities that related to black history at IU from 1900 to the present.

One of these was the timeline activity. One of the walls in the Wilkie auditorium displayed a timeline of important events in black history at IU. Underneath each tick on the timeline there was a description of what that moment in time was and underneath was a bag of pictures relating to that event. Attendees were instructed to select as many pictures as they wanted to use for the next activity.

After their selection,attendees were given instructions on how to use those photos to create a zine, or a small magazine which was a form of narrative used during the Civil Rights Movement, using the photos they chose.

“It introduces a new narrative into conversation and it was a lot of time s used as a way to revolutionize conversation about race and racial equity that were existing at the time,” said Eve Warner, IU student and community educator for Briscoe Quad.

The attendees could take home their zine after finishing.

Music by popular black artists, such as Aretha Franklin, was played while the attendees crafted. There was not a presentation on the music, but the music was chosen specifically to reflect the theme of the event, said Lauren Jines, student and community educator for Spruce Hall.

“Music influences culture, but it’s also a product of culture at that time,” Jines said.

Jasmine Filer, student and community educator for Collins LLC, said Residential Programs and Services wants to encourage diversity and inclusion around the community.

“We want to highlight what other IU students have done on campus and how current students can help themselves, motivate themselves to do the same thing,” Filer said.

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