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IUSG peer-to-peer organization advises students through misconduct process



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Pranita Sarangabany is a Student Rights case manager at IU. The branch of IU Student Government is a peer-to-peer organization composed of student case managers who help other students going through the IU misconduct process. Ty Vinson Buy Photos

Students who end up in trouble with IU will see a contact email for Student Rights listed on their misconduct letters. 

Student Rights is a branch of the IU Student Government which advises students going through the disciplinary process at IU. Offenses they address include alcohol violations, drug possessions and academic misconduct. 

Typically, the affected student will then reach out to the group, which sets up a meeting time to discuss basic tips and guidelines for the disciplinary process, Student Rights case manager Pranita Sarangabany said.

The branch is a peer-to-peer organization composed of student case managers who help other students going through the IU misconduct system, Sarangabany said. 

“It’s really nice to be able to give people answers and just be a reassuring voice through that process,” Sarangabany said. 

Collectively, the case managers see about five cases per month, Sarangabany said.

The case managers begin by explaining who they are, what they do and that all information will remain confidential, Sarangabany said.

Students Rights does not offer legal advice, but offers advice for the IU system. They can also mediate between students if there are conflicts.

Case managers undergo training before starting their work. They must go through interviews, complete case manager training, practice sample cases and shadow an established case manager.  The training teaches them how the process and the IU conduct system itself work.

Senior and Student Rights Director Katye Lester received mediation training when she was a student case manager. 

As director, she gets to work one-on-one with students while taking on a more administrative role in the organization. 

“It’s been really rewarding to help students get the guidance they need,” Lester said.

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