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How to stay safe in this week’s frigid temperatures



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The Ernie Pyle statue located in front of Franklin Hall is covered in snow Nov. 26. Wednesday's temperature is supposed to drop to a high of four degrees and a low of negative three. Haley Klezmer Buy Photos

Prepare to bundle up this week as Bloomington temperatures are expected to drop below zero.

Tuesday’s high is expected to be six degrees, and its low will hit negative 19 degrees with wind chill. Wednesday is supposed to drop to a high of negative 17 degrees with wind chill and a low of negative 23. Temperatures are expected to go back up to the 40s this weekend, but the week will be frigid. 

Classes are not expected to be canceled as of Sunday, IU spokesperson Chuck Carney said, but walking to class could be difficult this week. Carney said IU is preparing for the cold front.

“We will definitely take precautions by salting roads and sidewalks and making sure students don’t have trouble getting to class,” he said. “We encourage students to dress appropriately and take the bus across campus to avoid the cold.” 

Follow these other safety tips to manage the upcoming freezing temperatures.

Bundle up

Dress appropriately with  hats, gloves, scarves and multiple layers. Covering your face and chest is important to protect your lungs, according to the National Weather Service. 

Uncovered extremities such as hands and feet are the areas most prone to frostbite, so be sure to wear thick socks and gloves.

Tread carefully

The cold weather could bring icy roads and sidewalks with it. Walk slowly and carefully to avoid slipping on icy surfaces. Wear heavy snow boots with good traction while walking to class.

Anticipate car trouble

Extreme weather can often cause vehicle problems. According to Protect IU, it is a good idea to put together an emergency kit for your car, including blankets, food, water, jumper cables, a tire pump, a flashlight and a first-aid kit. Check your tires before traveling in cold or icy conditions. 

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