Indiana Daily Student

Faculty vote to prevent firing of graduate workers

<p>Doctoral candidate Pat Wall leads a chant during the graduate student strike April 14, 2022, at the Sample Gates. The Bloomington Faculty Council voted to assert that no graduate student workers will be fired for striking in a special meeting of the council May 9.</p>

Doctoral candidate Pat Wall leads a chant during the graduate student strike April 14, 2022, at the Sample Gates. The Bloomington Faculty Council voted to assert that no graduate student workers will be fired for striking in a special meeting of the council May 9.

Faculty members voted to assert that no student would be fired for striking or failing to submit grades in a special meeting of the Bloomington Faculty Council May 9. Of the 732  faculty members in attendance, 632 voted yes on the resolution, according to the Bloomington Faculty Council Executive Committee. 

The resolution also called for an immediate reappointment of graduate workers for the summer and emphasized their willingness to work with graduate workers to clarify policies that affect them. 

Other resolutions, including a call for the IU administration to recognize the union and graduate student cooperation with the administration, were also voted on at the meeting. As of this evening, the votes are still being counted.

The resolutions will have to be ratified by all faculty, including those not in attendance, due to a failure to reach quorum, which is 800 faculty members in attendance. 

Agenda items, including the potential vote of no confidence and the extension of the deadline for grades, were taken off the agenda by the Executive Committee. 

Steve Sanders, a member of the Executive Committee, said the decision to extend the grading deadline was not in the authority of the Bloomington Faculty Council because it is the University Faculty Council’s policy, which applies to all IU campuses.

Marietta Simpson, president of the Bloomington Faculty Council, said the vote of no confidence agenda item prompted a discussion and later vote, requiring two meetings. She said the item could be brought up again if it specified and required an immediate vote. 

“For the most part I think it was a respectful display of shared governance,” Simpson said.

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