Indiana Daily Student

IUSG Election Commission finds Elevate, Legacy responsible for election violations

<p>Juniors Ky Freeman and Madeline Dederichs, left, and Juniors Shibani Mody and Carrick Moon, right, pose for headshots. The IU Student Government Election Commission deducted two points from Legacy, Mody and Moon&#x27;s ticket, and four points from Elevate, Freeman and Dederichs&#x27; ticket.</p>

Juniors Ky Freeman and Madeline Dederichs, left, and Juniors Shibani Mody and Carrick Moon, right, pose for headshots. The IU Student Government Election Commission deducted two points from Legacy, Mody and Moon's ticket, and four points from Elevate, Freeman and Dederichs' ticket.

The IUSG Election Commission found the Elevate and Legacy tickets responsible for one election violation each Wednesday, according to documents from the commission. 

The commission deducted two points from Legacy and four points from Elevate. According to the IUSG bylaws, a ticket is disqualified if it loses 10 points or more.

Elevate was declared the preliminary winner of the IUSG election April 6, but the votes have not yet been certified by the IUSG Supreme Court. The court has until May 5 to certify votes, according to an email from the Election Commission. 

The IUSG Election Commission found Elevate responsible for a telecommunications violation, according to commission documents. Elevate sent emails to 315 people but failed to provide a clear way to opt-out of further communication, the commission said in a document. According to IUSG bylaws, any violation involving 51-500 people is a Class C violation, so the commission deducted four points. 

In its response to the complaint, Elevate said the emails included a Google Calendar Zoom meeting invite with an opt-out option, but the commission ruled that Elevate was not clear enough in offering recipients a way to opt-out. 

According to documents from the IUSG Election Commission, Legacy committed a telecommunications election violation as well. The Legacy campaign sent out a mass Canvas message on April 2 but failed to explicitly offer recipients a way to opt-out of messaging, according to documents from the commission. 

Additionally, the documents released by the IUSG Election Commission claim the commission repeatedly told all tickets that any campaign Canvas messages must be approved by the professor who controlled the Canvas page. There is no evidence that Legacy asked the professor permission before sending the message, the commission said in a document. 

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