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IUSG candidates match up one last time before elections



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IU Student Government candidates address questions March 25 about topics from high tuition to recent campus sexual violence. The IUSG debate was in the Whittenberger Auditorium at the Indiana Memorial Union. Junhui Wu Buy Photos

With elections approaching Wednesday and Thursday, the two tickets running to lead IU Student Government next year took an opportunity to familiarize students with their platforms one last time.

Bridge IU and Vision debated Monday in the Whittenberger Auditorium. About 30 people attended.

Mayor John Hamilton moderated, and each ticket gave two-minute responses to questions submitted by the Election Commission and students. Each team also gave five-minute opening statements and three-minute closing statements.

“What is the Vision?” said junior Isabel Mishkin, Vision presidential candidate, as she began her team’s opening statement. “Our vision is your vision.”

The Vision ticket continued outlining its policy groups, focusing on the dozens of student organizations they have worked with over the last three months.

Bridge IU then outlined their policies.

“We stand for bridging all aspects of campus and bringing students together,” said junior Mackenzie North, Bridge IU’s presidential candidate. “We will truly serve the students.”

The first questions addressed how student funds are spent and how much tuition costs, housing concerns after the mold crisis is set to move students off-campus and student access to health care. Vision and Bridge IU discussed student safety.

“One priority that Vision would have if elected would be to work with the recommendations released by the Sexual Misconduct Student Working Group,” Mishkin said. “We want to make sure we are fostering a safe community from the top down and the bottom up.”

She drew on her experience leading the Sexual Misconduct Student Working Group when addressing the issue.

Junior Megan Miller, Bridge IU's secretary candidate, also reflected on personal experience regarding student safety and well-being. A few summers ago, Miller said she returned to her high school to implement an educational program regarding consent and bystander training.

Bridge IU would have conversations with organizations including Middle Way House, the Office of Sexual Violence Prevention and Victim Advocacy and Culture of Care to work on protecting students, Miller said.

The tickets continued to discuss their policies regarding their proposed relationships with Bloomington, diversity and inclusion, IUSG reform and scooters.

The mayor then switched to a lightning round, giving tickets 30 seconds to answer why they wanted to be the president and vice president of student government.

North focused on how she wants to develop better relationships among students, administration, organizations on campus and alumni.

“I have so much background here, and I want to give back to the IU community,” she said.

Mishkin responded similarly.

“All I want to do is give back to the university that has given me so much and the organization that has made me the woman I am today,” she said.

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