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Plays, operas, dance coming to IU and Bloomington



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A mural hangs in the lobby of Bloomington Playwrights Project. The building is located at 107 W. Ninth St. Jacob deCastro Buy Photos

This spring, treat yourself. Bloomington is offering theater for any taste, whether it be light-hearted comedies like “Apropos of Nothing,” or soul-wrenching tragedies such as “Titus Andronicus.” This spring also offers some classics, such as “The Glass Menagerie” and “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” Below is a list of what to expect from the Bloomington theater scene this semester.


IU Theatre

“Titus Andronicus” by Shakespeare

In Shakespeare’s play about a war among the Roman Empire and the Goths, a Roman general named Titus returns from brutal battle. He finds his nation has betrayed him and his family slaughtered. The tragedy includes cannibalism and IU's website has warnings of torture and violence.

Jan. 18-19, 22-26

Ruth N. Halls Theatre

2019 Winter Dance Concert: Making Spaces, directed by Elizabeth Limons Shea

IU's Contemporary Dance Program will partner with IU Ballet Theatre to bring choreographer Twyla Tharp’s “Deuce Coupe” to Bloomington, marking the first time the two groups have collaborated on a show. The African American Dance Company also partnered with the Contemporary Dance Program for the show.

Feb. 8-10

Ruth N. Halls Theatre

At First Sight - A Festival of New Plays 

IU Theatre will produce two plays by MFA playwrights Aaron Ricciardi and Kaela Mei-Shing Garvin. The first play premieres Feb. 22 and the second premieres Feb. 27.

Feb. 22, 27

Wells-Metz Theatre

“Vinegar Tom” by Caryl Churchill

Set in the 17th century, this play follows two farm women accused of being witches by a man whose advances they've rejected. The work explores questions about non-conformity, gender and fears of female sexuality.

March 29-30, April 2-6

Wells-Metz Theatre

“Wonderful Town” by Joseph Fields and Jerome Chodorov

In this musical, Ruth and Eileen move from their rural Ohio home during the summer of 1935 to Greenwich Village, New York. There, the two follow their creative dreams and find love.

April 12-13, 16-20

Ruth N. Halls Theatre


Bloomington Playwrights Project

“Apropos of Nothing” by Greg Kalleres

After Owen confesses he’s in love with his best friend’s wife, everyone must reexamine their lives and relationships among struggles of relationships and emotions.

Jan. 18-19, 24-26, 31, Feb. 1-2

“The Jedi Handbook” by Stephen Massicotte

Through the eyes and imagination of a child, “The Jedi Handbook” is a look back at the Star Wars franchise and how it relates to the audience's ideas of childhood fantasy and wonder.

March 29-30, April 4-6, 11-13

“To Quiet the Quiet” by Christy Hall

Kathy has to deal with her past regrets, broken relationships and times of loss while struggling to maintain her sanity when one man may be able to offer assistance.

May 10-11, 16-18, 23-25


Ivy Tech John Waldron Arts Center

“Rounding Third,” by Richard Dresser

This comedy follows Don and Michael, two coaches of a little league baseball team. Don is determined to lead the team to complete victory, while Michael merely wants everyone to have fun.

Jan. 24-Feb. 10

“Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” lyrics by Time Rice, music by Andrew Lloyd Webber

Based on the biblical story of Joseph, this esteemed musical follows the story of Joseph and his jealous brothers after they sell Joseph into slavery.

Feb. 28-Mar. 3

“The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams

“The Glass Menagerie” is a memory play told by Tom, following his recollection of his Southern belle mother Amanda and his insecure sister Laura.

Mar. 21-Apr. 7

“Jekyll and Hyde,” adapted by Nicholas Briggs

Based on the famous short story by Robert Louis Stevenson, this Gothic drama follows Dr. Henry Jekyll, who believes there are two distinct sides to men — one good, one evil. He is intent on literally separating the two.

Apr. 12,13, 18-20

“The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley,” book by Timothy Allen McDonald

A bulletin board falls on 10-year-old Stanley Lambchop while he lies in bed. The next morning, he wakes up flat. This children’s musical follows Stanley as he searches the globe for a way to become three dimensional once again.

May 10-26

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