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'Where Are Ü Now': Diplo comes to IU



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Students wait in anticipation for concert headliner Diplo to take the stage during the Welcome Week Block Party hosted by Residential Programs and Services, the Residence Hall Association and the Indiana Memorial Union Board Saturday evening at 13th Street and Fee Lane. Andrew Williams Buy Photos

On Saturday, crowds of IU students filled a parking lot near 13th Street and Fee Lane to listen to alternative and EDM hits.

The Welcome Week Block Party, which is presented by the Residence Hall Association, Residential Programs and Services, and Union Board, is an annual concert for IU students.

The lineup this year included alternative rock band Teenage Wrist, DJ and producer Whethan and world-renowned EDM producer and DJ Diplo. 

Jaden Thomas, a freshman studying international business, said he bought a ticket for the show to start off the new school year right.

“I thought this would be a good way to meet people and have a good time at a loud, rowdy concert,” Thomas said.

Before the concert started, RHA and Union Board hosted a free carnival on the premises. Packed with rides and games, it was open 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. and was free to all IU students.  

Inside the venue, hungry students could purchase barbecue from the Great White Smoke food truck. And for thirsty attendees, the city of Bloomington set up water stations and provided cups, all free of charge.

Ike Evuvouwa, a junior studying finance and computer science, worked the Block Party concert as a hospitality runner with the Union Board. His job was to make sure artists' riders — lists of food, drinks or technical services they might need — were filled and that the artists had everything they needed.

“I got Whethan a knife,” Evuvouwa said. “I hear he really likes waffles and maybe he needed it for that.”

Also working with the Union Board as a hospitality runner was Sri Nalla, a sophomore studying finance. He was specifically in charge of keeping up with Teenage Wrist and making sure they had everything they needed, like La Croix and Mountain Dew. 

“It’s been kind of nice to be in contact with the actual artist because it’s nice to have that experience,” Nalla said. “It’s pretty cool because the lead singer is actually from my neighborhood in Colorado. It’s cool getting to know them as actual people.”

Tickets for students were $35 with a $10 discount for freshmen. 

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Bea Bradley, a freshman hoping to study studio art, said she decided to give the concert a try since a lot of her friends were going to be in attendance.

“I don’t really listen to EDM, and I’ve never heard Teenage Wrist before,” Bradley said. “This concert seemed like fun but I’m more into folk and indie bands.” 

Ethan Snoreck, aka Whethan, is a 19-year-old DJ from Chicago. He's collaborated with the likes of Charli XCX and Oh Wonder, and played remixes of some hits, like "Habits (Stay High)" by Tove Lo.

Teenage Wrist is an alternative rock band made up of Marshall Gallagher on guitar and vocals, Anthony Salazar on drums and Kamtin Mohager on bass guitar and vocals. Hailing from Los Angeles, their sound is grungy and raw. The crowd rocked out to songs like "Stoned, Alone" from their album "Chrome Neon Jesus." 

While the music blasted and a laser light show played on stage, students jumped and fist-pumped to Teenage Wrist, Whethan and, finally, Diplo. 

Diplo played some his hits, like "Where Are Ü Now" and "Lean On", while also remixing a few other artists popular songs, like "I'm Upset" and "God's Plan" by Drake, and "I Like It" by Cardi B. 

In between songs he would talk to the crowd saying, "I love you, Indiana" or counting down to the next beat drop. The visuals during Diplo's set were full of colorful laser lights and smoke that cascaded out of the stage.

“EDM in general is pretty hype,” Thomas said. “So it was bound to be a great concert.” 

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