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Thursday, June 13
The Indiana Daily Student

The Indiana Daily Student

Beginning a life of opportunity

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Charleston Sanders, a masters student, recently said, "The best job in the world is doing something you love and being able to pay the bills doing it. I want to make a difference in people's lives, and music will be one of the avenues through which I can make that difference."


The Indiana Daily Student

Carlin pleases with trademark wit

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Comedian George Carlin strode onstage in his trademark black jeans and shirt, with nothing more than a few papers, a glass of water and his notoriously filthy mouth to keep him company. Despite his loathing for politics and complete disregard for tact and compassion, he started by addressing the issue of the World Trade Center attacks. He even practiced some of the act he intends to use in his upcoming performance in New York to see if it was well--received.


The Indiana Daily Student

From city hall to center for arts

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The stone building at 122 S. Walnut St. was once Bloomington City Hall. Until 1985, it housed the police department. And 10 years ago it was redeveloped to fulfill a new purpose: bringing the arts to Bloomington. Through all the residents, the building's face has changed little. It is unlike any other place in Bloomington. The two theaters and three galleries in the John Waldron Arts Center give local artists and performers a place to show their work.


The Indiana Daily Student

Band makes music life's pursuit

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The Bouncing Souls never desired nine-to-five office jobs. Good times and music went hand in hand, and that meant too much for them to trade in their instruments for suits and ties or their BMXs for laptops.

The Indiana Daily Student

Ladies First celebrates album release

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Wednesday night, a group of female students rehearsed -- fine-tuning every note, reviewing choreography, straightening out any last wrinkles in their performance. In a few days, they would be entertaining a live crowd, promoting the release of their second album. Ladies First, IU's female a cappella group, will celebrate the release of their new album Ticket to Anywhere today at 8 p.m. at the Willkie Quad Auditorium. The concert will feature songs from the new album.


The Indiana Daily Student

Music fraternity enriches life with song

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During its 98-year history, the Mu Phi Epsilon music fraternity has sought to enrich local communities with free concerts and recitals, community service projects and music education and appreciation classes.


The Indiana Daily Student

The sound of victory

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Composed and collected, Maria Luisa Rayan climbed the stairs at the Musical Arts Center Sunday evening before a crowd of hundreds. Swathed in burgundy velvet, the striking Argentinian smiled graciously at the audience, shook the judges' hands and accepted her second-place award in the fifth triannual USA International Harp Competition. It was her third time entering the contest -- and her second emergence as runner-up. Two tries, and two second-place finishes. For some, such outcomes may signal defeat. Others may retreat from the instrument. But for Rayan, the harp is practically an appendage. It's evident in her caress of the strings, in her soft, transported expression as her hands graze the instrument.


The Indiana Daily Student

Big-city cabaret comes to town

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Tonight the Bloomington Playwrights Project invites the audience to take part in one-of-a-kind experience that will explore the detours of life through song. Washington D.C. performer Colin James' original one man cabaret "Detour Ahead" will be held tonight and tomorrow at the BPP at 8 p.m.



The Indiana Daily Student

Meeting the stars of Ragtime

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My dream finally came true. My whole life, I've dreamt of standing at the stage door after a show and seeing the actors fresh off the stage from a performance. Tuesday night at "Ragtime," that dream was made possible.


The Indiana Daily Student

Arts center presents famous musical

"Please God, I need this show!" sings the company of "A Chorus Line," the show opening this week at the John Waldron Arts Center, 122 S. Walnut St., by the B-town Players. The hit 1970s musical by Musical Theater guru Marvin Hamlisch has at its core the drive of all artists trying to make a name for themselves in a difficult business.


The Indiana Daily Student

'Children' combines ASL, theater

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The upcoming play "Children of a Lesser God" combines the love of theater and practice of American Sign Language held by much of its cast. Directed by senior Ingrid Torres, the show is being produced as an independent project. "It blends the two things I studied in college -- sign language and theater," Torres said. "Children of a Lesser God" follows the story of a speech therapist, played by senior Stuart Ritter, who falls in love with Sarah, a deaf student. They marry and seem happy, but through the course of the play, their relationship begins to crumble over a litigation suit against the School for the Deaf. Sarah decides she wants to make her own statement in court and not let others continue to speak for her, and the marriage between the two begins to fall apart.


The Indiana Daily Student

Auditions: the fine art of getting the part

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Auditions. The cause of bitten nails, stomach aches and superstitions, the making or breaking of a career. Is it possible to ace an audition? If the outcome of an audition never ends in happiness, maybe your audition skills need some tweaking at the roots. "All auditions are different," said Iris Rosa, director of the African American Dance Company.


The Indiana Daily Student

Keys, 'O Brother' big winners

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LOS ANGELES -- The Grammys came down with a case of the blues, giving five awards each to the melancholy piano songstress Alicia Keys and the old-school bluegrass and soul of the "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack. Irish rockers U2 won four Grammys Wednesday, including record of the year for "Walk On," a soaring rock anthem the group said found new meaning after Sept. 11. "When this country takes you to its heart it's an extraordinary feeling. And these are very testy times for America, so we know you're not just taking anybody to heart," U2's lead singer Bono said backstage.


The Indiana Daily Student

Going bananas over simple comfort food

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We live in an age of high fashion food; hence, the commonplace banana has no more glamour than a nylon nightgown. But glamour can be exhausting, and slowing down to savor the familiar goodness of a banana is one of life's pleasures.


The Indiana Daily Student

Terrorist attacks alter lineup of Lotus Festival

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Bloomington's Lotus World Music and Arts Festival, an annual five-day event scheduled to begin Wednesday, will be adversely affected by the transportation problems stemming from the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington Tuesday. The disruption of air travel and general international tension have already led to one band cancellation -- Celtic pop group Kila have announced they will not make the festival. But Executive Director Lee Williams said the show would go on.


The Indiana Daily Student

DiFranco fans ready for IU show

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For folk rocker Ani DiFranco, music is a way of making sense of the universe. "My little songs are sort of letters to myself," DiFranco told Music Connection. I'm trying to clue myself in on some things. It's all a very self-conscious process on some level. My music, I guess, is what I live through." DiFranco will perform at 9:30 p.m. Saturday at the IU Auditorium. Union Board is sponsoring the event.


The Indiana Daily Student

Parks departments showcase the "Art of Nature"

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The sounds of children running, banjos playing and people laughing could be heard at Karst Farm Park, Saturday during. The Bloomington and Monroe County Parks and Recreation department sponsored the annual event in order to raise awareness about local environmental issues and provide fun nature-based activities.


The Indiana Daily Student

Bloomington native a classical prodigy

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It is always exciting to see a talented young musician grow into a major player on the tough classical music scene. Even more of a thrill is to know that you were there in the beginning and helped his or her career move from the practice rooms of a university into the world's most famous concert halls.