arts   |   community events

Bloomington Arts Commission offering up to $5,000 for bicentennial song submissions



The Bloomington Arts Commission is offering up to $5,000 for an artist to create a musical work celebrating the City’s bicentennial, according to a press release distributed Jan. 5.

Commission members said they encourage Indiana residents to apply by the Feb. 9 deadline.

The commission will release the decision on the winning applicant by Feb. 23, and the project must be completed by June 2018.

“We invite applicants from all musical backgrounds with a passion for collaboration and community engagement,” Sean Starowitz, assistant director of economic and sustainable development for the arts, said.

A panel of Bloomington residents, Bloomington Arts Commission members and City of Bloomington staff will choose from applicants who are required to write a melody with lyrics celebrating the city’s past, present and future.

The commission suggests connecting the song’s lyrics to Bloomington by collaborating with a local poet or writer.

The panel will listen to a three-minute music clip from each applicant to help decide the winner.

The commission members want a song that untrained singers would still be able to sing, according to the press release.

The chosen applicant will also be required to teach the song to attendees of at least three City of Bloomington Bicentennial events.

The project proposal must also include suggestions for ways to include the community or local musicians and arts organizations.

“To support greater opportunities for public participation, the work should have the flexibility to evolve,” Starowitz said.

Applicants must be Indiana residents who are at least 18 years old. 

To apply, residents can submit their contact information and portfolio to Sean Starowitz at starowis@bloomington.in.gov. The application should also include a statement describing previous arts experience, as well as a description of the project proposal.

Artists will be paid after the project is complete.

Christine Fernando

Like what you're reading? Support independent, award-winning college journalism on this site. Donate here.

More in Arts



Comments powered by Disqus