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Brody magnificent in Holocaust film as 'The Pianist'


By Mike D’Avria and Mike D’Avria



Every year there are a few Holocaust films that come out, but don't leave a lasting impression. With the exception of memorable films like "Schindler's List," and "Life is Beautiful," many of these films about the Nazi persecution of the Jewish people leave the theater and are soon forgotten. Roman Polanski's new film "The Pianist," is one film that will not be forgotten, and is truly one of the best films of this past year.\nThe story is about a successful Polish radio pianist, Wladyslaw Szpilman (Adrien Brody), and the Nazi invasion of Warsaw during World War II. Szpilman, along with his family, are relocated to the Jewish ghetto, along with the other 360,000 Jews in Warsaw. The film shows all of these people trying to survive inside the walls of the ghetto on almost no food, money or adequate clothing, not to mention the random executions by the hands of Nazis. When the Jews are then further relocated to Nazi labor camps, Szpilman is separated from his family, but manages to escape before the train leaves and goes into hiding. \nThe film is based on a true story, and Brody does an outstanding job of portraying this Jewish pianist on the run from the Gestapo. We see what he sees, hears what he hears and feels what he feels in this paranoid world that Polanski has recreated on film. Polanski leaves no detail out, and shows how malicious and truly evil the Nazis were with their plans to establish an Aryan race. Whether it's watching the Nazi's shoot a Jewish woman in the head for asking a question, or throwing an elderly wheel-chaired man off a high balcony, this film does not skimp on the torture these people went through. Over and over again Szpilman's story shows the Nazi's hatred for the Jews unlike any other film has.\nWithout a doubt, Brody will be nominated for an Oscar for this role, simply because he is magnificent. The film is also unquestionably worthy of the nominations it will receive, not only for best score, best screenplay and best director, but for best film as well.

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